Crisis? What Crisis?

Illustration by Manos Symeonakis

I’d heard it said many times, in many ways but never with such clarity. It fell to Thanassis, an advertising company employee vacationing on Serifos to deliver a wonderfully succinct assessment of the country’s mood. “Everybody is waiting for September without knowing whether it will be a new beginning, or the beginning of the end,” Thanassis, who clearly has a flair for dramatic turns of phrase, told Agence France-Presse. All his experience as an advertising executive didn’t prevent him from not only jumping on this particular bandwagon but riding it all the way into the imaginary Doomsday sunset like a champion jockey.

September is no longer just any month in most Greeks’ minds, it’s a mystical watershed, a moment in time when clocks will stop, spoons will bend and fish will jump out of the sea. Spurred on by journalists and commentators who can’t resist stirring up a hornet’s nest and politicians who are desperate to be part of the madding crowd, Greeks have become obsessed about September being the month when time will catch up with Greece and lash them viciously against the rocks of hardship.

Of course there will be some tough times in September: the government will begin taking on the closed professions as it starts its liberalization program; a drop in tax revenues due to reduced household spending will require new austerity measures that could include more VAT hikes and spending cuts, and, our IMF and EU overseers will be back to check our books. But, hold on a second. Isn’t all this starting to sound a little familiar? Sure, September will bring new hardships but it’s not like January through to August has been a walk in the park. It was only a few days ago that the head of the IMF mission in Greece, Poul Thomsen, said that “Few European countries have produced so many reforms in such a short time.”

Is it possible that a quick dip in the Aegean and a couple of tequila slammers over the summer has made us forget all this? Don’t we remember how many experts predicted Greece would be bankrupt before the summer, the euro was facing imminent collapse and the EU would implode? Well, here’s some news: the euro has gained 10 percent against the dollar over the past two months, the risk premium on Spanish, Italian and Portuguese government debt has dropped and data published earlier this month showed the German economy grew by 2.2 percent in the second quarter of this year, its best performance since reunification 20 years ago. Sure, the spread on Irish bonds inched up last week and Slovakia says it won’t stump up the cash for Greece’s rescue package but it’s far from the apocalypse many dreaded.

Most bold predictions have been undone and, if anything, several months on from when the debt crisis began, the only thing we can say with any confidence is that there are more unanswered questions than when we began. It seems certain as we continue this fascinating journey into uncharted territory that September will not be a new beginning or the beginning of the end; it will be just another month in a long, hard slog as we adapt to a whole new set of parameters.

Each bump along the road will not only jolt us but it will enlighten us and, hopefully, inch Greeks closer to achieving a more stable and fairer future, free from the favoritism and myopic thinking of the past. To appreciate how the crisis has shaken things up, we only need to look at how Greece has gone from being an inert country not just gathering dust but accumulating it in huge piles, to one that finds itself at the coalface of the global economy. It used to be that reforms only existed so we could create more shelves to put them on but this year we have seen changes pushed through with breathtaking speed. Not too long ago, Greek prime ministers seemed to only venture abroad if the shopping was good but now George Papandreou is racking up more air miles than George Clooney as he seeks to preach the good word about Greece’s gallant fight with its economic demons and grab a seat at the table where the big players take decisions.

The crisis has been good for Greece. It’s created the best chance the country has of achieving catharsis and tangible change. Critics, though, will argue the process is devalued because Greece is following the instructions of foreigners. In fact, New Democracy, after almost a year in opposition, has decided this is the government’s Achilles heal. Lately, the conservatives have taken to calling Papandreou and his team “the memorandum government” in reference to the agreement Greece signed with the EU and IMF to obtain 110 billion euros in loans. Yes, it’s taken nine months to come up with this dazzling repartee. However, if the wisecrackers at ND headquarters could sew their split sides back together for a moment, they’d realize that after the flaccidness of their five years in office, it really doesn’t matter where the instructions are coming from. What counts is that the status quo, which worked in favor of the few, is being confronted. It’s natural that only outsiders could instigate this challenge since our own decision makers – some of the members of the current PASOK government included – were draughtsmen of, and shareholders in, the previous, failed system.

New Democracy, like all the political parties, is preparing for the November local elections, which are expected to be a litmus test for Greek politics. Some big name politicians want to avoid throwing themselves at the mercy of the electorate and the big parties intend to take a much more low-key role than usual, allowing local politicians to form their own alignments and groupings. The fact that rather than being drawn to power, politicians and parties are daunted by the prospect of being scrutinized or having to answer to the public is evidence of how the crisis is reordering things in Greece.

So, this September, instead of being cowed by the doom-mongers and naysayers, let’s take heart from the potential of our situation. Like so many other European countries, for Greece the next decade will be about taking steps to bring its debt and deficit under control. With that come some very harsh measures, as we already know, but, unlike other European countries, it also presents Greece with the opportunity to right wrongs, correct injustices and rebuild our dilapidated structures. That’s why we should not fear the crisis, but embrace and master it – it could be the only opportunity we have to press reset rather than the self-destruct button.

This commentary was written by Nick Malkoutzis and was published in Athens Plus on August 20, 2010.

2 responses to “Crisis? What Crisis?

  1. Dear Mr Malkoutzis.
    For once more you managed to ”unfold” the truth of the various events occuring the past few months in our country.I am extremely bothered by the persistance in focusing on the huge catastrophe awaiting ahead of us.I think that this is the beginning of a new path for Greece.The end of corruption has to come to an end and eventually putting such measures into action might somehow gurantee that.

    • Thank you for your comment Monika. You give me an opportunity to clarify what I meant in the piece. Someone accused me the other day of ignoring the hardship that some people face because of the worsening economic situation. I think I make it clear that Greeks are in for even more hardship than they have suffered over the last few months. The situation will undoubtedly get worse – all the indicators are there: unemployment, falling revenues, decreasing consumption, etc. But my point is that many people seem to be regurgitating this idea that the country is going to implode without really grasping what they are talking about. As a result, we are ignoring the opportunities that are presented to us as a country to rectify a whole range of things. If we fail to do so, then the suffering will really be prolonged and all those who will lose jobs, businesses, homes, etc will have done so in vain because we will be destined to repeat our destructive pattern.

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